Coventry’s health board has announced it’s stopping all non-essential staff from working in its hospital.

The move follows a spate of suicides and suicide attempts among NHS staff, with a third of Coventry residents claiming to have tried to take their own lives in the last month.

Coventry Health chief executive Mike Brown said staff would be allowed to work from home for an extended period, with the exception of emergency work.

“Our aim is to protect our staff’s lives and ensure the safety of our patients. “

“In response to the recent spate of incidents, we are taking steps to address the safety and wellbeing of staff and our patients.” “

Coventry is one of the country’s most violent cities. “

In response to the recent spate of incidents, we are taking steps to address the safety and wellbeing of staff and our patients.”

Coventry is one of the country’s most violent cities.

The NHS’s suicide rate is one in 10,000.

Covent Care has reported more than 400 suicides, including 12 in 2016 alone.

Covid-19 has been linked to the high number of suicides.

It is one reason why people who have already lost their jobs may be unable to find work.

In the last 12 months, Coventry has had 17 deaths, including four in just two days.

It also saw a rise in coronavirus cases.

Covid, the virus that causes coronaviral disease, was discovered in a patient in the UK’s capital in February 2016. “

The safety of Covent care staff and communities is paramount and this is why we are working with NHS Covid experts and the health sector to ensure Coventry stays a safe and secure place.”

Covid, the virus that causes coronaviral disease, was discovered in a patient in the UK’s capital in February 2016.

More than 5,000 people have died from the disease since then.

It can be fatal in some people, especially older people and people with underlying medical conditions.

The outbreak is the deadliest since the UK declared an Ebola-free status in October 2015.